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Curious Quotations

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  • "A frog poses a more daunting scientific challenge than a star"
    - Martin Rees (British cosmologist and astrophysicist. 1942 ), Dreifus, C. "A Conversation with Sir Martin Rees: Tracing Evolution of Cosmos From its Simplest Elements", The New York Times, April 28, 1998.
  • "We are the dust of long dead stars. Or, if you want to be less romantic, we are nuclear waste."
    - Martin Rees, Dreifus, C. "A Conversation with Sir Martin Rees: Tracing Evolution of Cosmos From its Simplest Elements", The New York Times, April 28, 1998.
  • "Only two general truths emerge from the study of history. One is that things tend to change much more, and much more quickly, than one might think. The other is that they tend to change much less, and much more slowly, than one might think."
    - J.M. Roberts, The Penguin History of The World. Third edition, 1995.
  • "I can think of nothing less pleasurable than a life devoted to pleasure."
    - John Davison Rockefeller (American industrialist and philanthropist. 18391937)
  • "Pure mathematics consists entirely of assertions to the effect that if such and such a proposition is true of anything, then such and such another proposition is true of that thing. It is essential not to discuss whether the first proposition is really true, and not to mention what the anything is of which it is supposed to be true. ... Thus mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, not whether what we are saying is true."
    - Bertrand Russell (Philosopher and mathematician 1872-1970), Mysticism and Logic
  • "The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it."
    - Bertrand Russell, Mysticism and Logic
  • The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent full of doubt.
    - Bertrand Russell, Mysticism and Logic
  • "I wish to propose for the reader's favourable consideration a doctrine which may, I fear, appear wildly paradoxical and subversive. The doctrine in question is this: that it is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true."
    - Bertrand Russell, From "Introduction: On the Value of Scepticism", Sceptical Essays.

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